Author Topic: What's a feature that hasn't been announced that you'd like to see the most?  (Read 886 times)

Offline mdqp

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I just thought of another feature I'd like to see (I hope it wasn't mentioned already): companions. NPCs whose trust you earn and are willing to join you on your adventures. Obviously it cannot be anyone too high up like a Prince of Primogen, but perhaps a fellow Thin Blood, a ghoul, or another vampire/capable fighter you've helped along the way. Plus, if the framework were in place, adding other characters would probably be easier too, including custom ones.

I wonder how much the tone of the game affects the choice of giving us companions or not. I think it would be nice to have companions from time to time, for sure, although that depends on how good the AI is (a bad AI can make the experience miserable, especially if you don't have much control over it).

Offline VampireBill

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Since it's going to be 1st person only: VR. Though they'd then have to disable all of the 3rd person bits and flippy-stuff because it'd be instant vomit, heh. The graphics don't look "cutting-edge" enough that it should be too much of a problem performance-wise. I've had an Oculus Rift for well over a year and it quickly got relegated to.... VR pr0n, ha. The headset pinched my head too much and the games I messed with briefly seemed like just neat tech demos and felt too limited. Then recently Skyrim VR and Fallout 4 VR finally went on sale for under $20 (I refused to buy the games again for $60 when all it was doing was changing a few small files), and... hoooly crap, even though I had already put combined thousands of hours into both original games, it's like playing brand new games again. I dunno if I can go back to the regular versions now, and I've been someone who has remained firmly in the 3rd person camp so I can ogle my CBBE slooty-armored whamen characters.

I quickly decided to actually bother to adjust the headset straps enough to make it more comfortable, then worked my way up from playing seated to being able to handle playing standing with direct-movement (teleporting movement is annoying af in a big open world) then worked on getting everything sorted out so I could play with 360 degree movement. Now I can pretty easily stay playing for hours at a time. Which, of course, is actually bad, because I already put off real world responsibilities (you know, like... eating, going to the bathroom, studying the language of the country I've moved to...) enough when I get sucked into regular games. In VR you can't see the passage of time at all... "Whoops, it's broad daylight now..."
« Last Edit: August 18, 2019, 08:00:23 AM by VampireBill »

Offline mdqp

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I wonder if VR wouldn't be too hard to implement anyway, given the kind of mobility they want for the game (even without the 3rd person stuff, seems like there would be many vomit-inducing situations). How is VR going? I have 0 interest in ever getting a headset, but I am curious about the market adoption rate, if nothing else because of how it might affect future games.

Offline VampireBill

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I wonder if VR wouldn't be too hard to implement anyway, given the kind of mobility they want for the game (even without the 3rd person stuff, seems like there would be many vomit-inducing situations). How is VR going? I have 0 interest in ever getting a headset, but I am curious about the market adoption rate, if nothing else because of how it might affect future games.

That very well may end up being the case, but the basic combat stuff they've shown hasn't looked too problematic, aside from the flipping in melee combat which looked stupid and impractical anyway. It seems like a fair amount of the real fast-paced stuff is going to end up being in bullet-time, which would reduce nausea considerably. Quake 2 is actually playable for me in VR, but so far I've only tried it sitting down, and not with "always run" on, because the "walk" in that is faster than "sprint" in most modern games, haha. Also, in real life I can actually get queasy pretty easily, I've never been able to handle spinning in rides very well, and now that I'm 35 I can't even turn around fast without getting a bit of vertigo, so the VR vertigo does seem to be able to be "trained" away at least to some extent.

Exploring both the overworld and the dungeons in Skyrim in VR is absolutely amazing (cresting ridges or leaning forward to peak around catacomb corners to see what lies beyond), even with the fuzzy picture and screen door effect of the first commercial release Oculus Rift, so I can only begin to imagine how good it will look in a few more headset generations. Interacting with NPCs takes on new intimacy as well, whereas previously I could hardly skip through dialogue fast enough (after playing both Skyrim and Fallout 4 several times each), I'm actually listening to it again. And uh... walking up to cowering/crippled enemies to finish them off execution style feels a whole lot more personal too, -to where I have to think about it a bit more (though, I've always had a hard time even being an asshole in games, let alone evil, ha). And those are just games that had VR shoehorned into them long after their original release...

That kinda stuff is what got me *really* thinking about what the experience of a VTM game would be from that perspective.